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Bike To Work Day in Reston

Bike to Work Day is celebrated each year to encourage more people to travel by bike.

Over 350 bicyclists rode to the Reston Town Center this morning to celebrate Bike to Work Day. They were treated to free breakfast from Community Canteen, Great Harvest Bread Co., and Whole Foods Market. The Bike Lane was on hand to check out cyclists' bikes, and owner Anne Mader displayed photos and video from previous events. The Reston Bike Club, Friends of the W&OD Trail, Reston Association, the Y, LINK, and Fairfax Advocates for Better Bicycling had information tables and free items for cyclists.

Liz Badley of Reston Association introduced Congressman Gerry Connolly,  Hunter Mill Supervisor Cathy Hudgins, and RA President Ken Knueven who addressed the crowd at 8 a.m. They all noted the importance of bicycling as a transportation option. Knueven rode from his home in the Lake Anne area.

My wife Kerie and I left our home at around 5:30 a.m. to ride to the Pavilion and to help set up for the event. Our three-mile ride took around 20 minutes, and we passed several other cyclists, even at that time in the morning. The weather was near perfect, resulting in record numbers of people riding in the DC area.

Bike to Work Day is held each year to encourage commuters to leave their car at home and bicycle to work. Many people find that it's an enjoyable, healthy way to get to work. Short trips by car are the least efficient and generate the most pollution and are easily taken by bike. No special clothing is needed either; just hop on the bike and go. Why not start out next week by riding to work, school, or for other short trips?

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John Farrell May 18, 2012 at 09:49 PM
Based on the photograph less than 0.1% of RA members participated in this event. Glad for them but the other 99.9% should not be deprived the use of the roads, from edge of pavement to edge of pavement, for this tiny, tiny minority.
Uncle Smartypants May 18, 2012 at 10:39 PM
But 100% of RA members benefited from it - both locally: fewer cars on the road, cleaner air, and globally: gas not consumed. As a society, we need to work towards people commuting solo in a car being the tiny, tiny minority, for both our personal health and the health of the planet. This (mostly symbolic) event is just the first steps in that direction. Please don't begrudge giving up a little bit of pavement for a few hours once a year.
John Farrell May 19, 2012 at 04:34 AM
What is begrudged is permanently giving up pavement on Lawyers and Soapstone and the inconvenience, delay and lack of safety imposed on the 99.9% of travelers not on bikes. Especially when alternates exist for the bikers that have far lower traffic volumes than either Lawyers or Soapstone. Before single occupancy automobiles, it was single occupancy horse buggies. And each horse generated 25 pounds of manure a day. Imagine the health impacts of that as successive cart ground those horse buns into a fine dust. The internal combustion engine will be gone within the next decade or so. Then what will be the excuse for taking pavement away from travelers in cars in favor of bikes?
Uncle Smartypants May 19, 2012 at 02:29 PM
I'm not ready to write the obit for our venerable internal combustion engine. If science can figure out a way to convert self-righteous indignation into gasoline, it'll be around forever.
Richard Holmquist May 20, 2012 at 02:52 PM
A horse isn't the only thing that generates 25 pounds of manure a day. Just admit that none of the disasters that you predicted have occurred on Soapstone. The work created a very pleasant and safe road that was prone to excessive speed in the past. Traffic does not back up to the 7-11 from South Lakes Dr as you predicted, and it comes with the added benefit of a new bike lane. Furthermore, these changes are not as permanent as you suggest. All it takes is to re-line the roads to eliminate the bike lanes entirely if future traffic requires it - but I've been waiting my whole life for Lawyer's Road volume to justify the size of that road.
Richard Holmquist May 20, 2012 at 02:58 PM
BTWD 2012 was effective on me. I got out of my car and rode my bike to work for the first time since my office moved over a year ago - a big step to doing so on a more frequent basis. Bruce Wright and others deserve great credit for their continued work toward good health, clean air and lower traffic congestion. I see from the news reports that participation in the DC area this year was up about 15% from last year. Great work. Nice to see Supervisor Hudgins and Congressman Connelly showing their personal support at the Town Center pit stop.

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